The 2014 Governor’s Buy Local Cookout: Silver and the Watermelon Queens

Silver Queen. How evocative is that phrase? For your faithful correspondent, it conjures the corner farm market, whose produce came from the fields down the road. Every day at 6 p.m. in corn season (stretched out by serial plantings), a flat of Silver Queen arrived behind a tractor. The second picking of the day, timed to catch the home-bound traffic.

You walked down to the end of the driveway when the line of cars backed up past your house because the tractor was making its slow progress down the two-lane road. Put a dollar in your pocket and came back with six ears, which you husked and placed in the pot of water that you had put on the stove to boil just before you left the house. Ate some off the cob, stripped the rest for next day’s lunch.

It wasn’t anything special; Silver Queen was what was planted for eating corn in Maryland forty years ago. It was everywhere, in every farm stand on New Hampshire Avenue from the Silver Spring line to Damascus.

It had great corn flavor, but its sweetness was ephemeral. It had to be cooked as soon as picked, or it would turn starchy. Nobody grows it anymore. It’s been supplanted by a thing that looks like corn, but tastes of nothing but sugar.

Now, this was meant to be a report on the state of agriculture in Maryland, as represented by the 2014 Governor’s Buy Local Cookout, but I see it has turned into an exercise in nostalgia. Bear with me. There was Silver Queen at the cookout, because at least one farmer in Maryland is still growing it.

Silver Queen and Heirloom Tomatoes

Silver Queen and Heirloom Tomatoes

Goat Cheese and Silver Queen Corn Cake with Smoky Tomato Ginger Jam, it said on the sign, and indeed, it was a fine goat cheese and corn cake, and the jam was nice too, but I would have been just as happy (happier!) with a just-picked ear, freshly shucked and plainly boiled, with a little butter and salt.

Chef Bryan Davis, of The Classic Catering People in Owings Mills, told me that the retro-farmer responsible for the corn was Nick Bailey of Grand View Farm in Forest Hill. I’m planning a field trip for the 2015 corn season.

Meanwhile, on another part of the Governor’s lawn, the crowd of folks involved in food production and distribution in Maryland were milling around the tables trying samples of our state’s bounty. There were patriotic shorts,

O Maryland, My Maryland!

O Maryland, My Maryland!

local and state-wide personalities,

Sandy Heiler of Brookeville With Gov. O'Malley

Sandy Heiler of Brookeville With Gov. O’Malley

State Senator Karen and Harry Montgomery With Sandy

State Senator Karen and Harry Montgomery With Sandy

and, of course, the Watermelon Queen.

Watermelon Queen Shelby Hurley

Watermelon Queen Shelby Hurley

The tables offered delicious food prepared by local chefs

Have A Taste!

Have A Taste!

Crabby Garnish

Crabby Garnish

and tipples by local distilleries and wineries.

Lyon Distilling

Lyon Distilling

including the Olney Farmers Market’s own Mark Mills of Chocolates and Tomatoes Farm.

Governor O’Malley entertained not only by reading a Proclamation, as one would expect from a governor, but by singing and playing, as well.

Gov. O'Malley Proclaims

Gov. O’Malley Proclaims

And Then He Entertains

And Then He Entertains!

As the sun set over Annapolis, another successful Buy Local Cookout concluded. And I left with the taste of Silver Queen on my palate.

Sunset

Sunset

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Truck On Down To The Food Truck Convention

The food truck scene in our area has exploded in the last few years. Time was, if you wanted more than a hot dog when dining al fresco in downtown DC, you were out of luck. And try finding food on wheels in the ‘burbs! But those were the bad old days.

It’s a different scene now. Food trucks of all descriptions are blossoming in the city and even out here in the trackless wilderness of Montgomery County. And with proliferation comes organization. The DMV FTA, the DC, Maryland, and Virginia Food Truck Association, is stepping up.

The Capital City Food Truck Convention will be held on Sunday, April 19 at the One Eight Distillery in Washington, DC. This is the first event for food truck operators, aspiring food truck owners, industry purveyors, and service providers in our area. Education and networking are promised. There will be workshops, inspirational talks, and an exhibit of products and services. And, according to FTA Executive Director Che Ruddell-Tabisola, there will be awards to “unsung heroes” – pioneers and local leaders of the industry.

Although aimed mainly towards those already or potentially involved with food trucks, the general public is invited to join and attend. See the link above for details.

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Two Lessons on Italian Food: Francine Segan on Pasta, Coffee, Chocolate and Other Delights

“She’s prettier in person,” the middle-aged man next to me whispered. He was right. Francine Segan, cookbook author, host of the TV series Americans who Love Italy, expert on Italian cuisine, stood at the lectern wearing a beautifully-embroidered coat. She was ready to deliver a complete history of Italian cuisine in a little over an hour. A neat trick, especially with the audience distracted by the ornate decorations of the European Reading Room.

Ms. Segan on a Slide, and the Ceiling

Ms. Segan on a Slide, and the Ceiling

Ms. Segan in Person, and a Mural

Ms. Segan in Person, and a Mural

We were seated in between the rows of bookcases in this remote section of the Library of Congress’ Thomas Jefferson Building (usually open only to scholars), to hear Ms. Segan deliver a talk rather grandiosely titled “Italian Gastronomic Traditions and Innovations: The Historical, Cultural and Social Importance of Food in Italy.”

The European Reading Room

The European Reading Room

Introduced by Grant Harris, the Head of the Room, she proved to be warmer and more engaging than her talk’s title. Concentrating on pasta, desserts and coffee, she provided a dizzying tour through many types and shapes of pasta I had never before seen, then transitioned to desserts by way of pasta combined with sweet cheese (cannoli, cassata), and gelato in brioche for breakfast (!)

Panettone, that sweet, raisin-filled bread ubiquitous around the winter holidays, is traditionally made with natural yeast which must be nurtured for 30 to 40 days before the bread is made. Ms. Segan told us how she decided to test the claim that it would keep for six months without preservatives. She tucked several loaves away in her closet and – lo and behold! it’s true!

Did you know that there is a tradition of caffè sospeso, or “suspended coffee,” by which one pays for two coffee drinks but receives only one, and that other one is later served free to a patron who would not be able to afford it?

And then there is Caffè alla valdostana, coffee and grappa passed around in a communal cup after a long day skiing in the Valle d’Aosta. La dolce vita.

After her talk, Renato Miracco, Cultural Attachè at the Embassy of Italy, presented one of Ms. Segan’s cookbooks to the Library. He also reminded us that the next day Ms. Segan would be speaking at the Embassy about chocolate. Indeed!

Ms. Segan, Mr. Miracco, Mr. Harris

Ms. Segan, Mr. Miracco, Mr. Harris

The Book Presentation (and That Ceiling Again)

The Book Presentation (and That Ceiling Again)

“Italy’s Sweet Chocolate History,” a talk without a colon but with just as much culinary content as the day before, had a bigger audience and a more accessible venue – and tastings as well.

At The Lecturn

At The Lectern

Before the history, Ms. Segan (in another beautiful coat) gave a lesson in tasting chocolate, which we were to save for later. We must snap, smell, feel and taste the chocolate “just like wine, except you don’t have to spit!”

She had spent some time in a cacao-growing region, and took us through each stage in the preparation of chocolate: harvesting the pods, fermentation, drying, shipping, toasting, grinding. The cacao was consumed at this stage for centuries by the Aztecs and others, dissolved in water.

In Italy, it was sprinkled on polenta and combined with game, and used in a dish that sounds so good I can’t wait to try it: Tagliatelli al cacao con salsa gorgonzola (Chocolate Tagiatelli with Gorgonzola Sauce, and walnuts).

It was the first food containing caffeine brought into Europe, before tea and coffee. It must have had quite an effect on those who could afford it!

And then in 1865, gianduia was invented; and in 1964, Nutella. Both are chocolate and hazelnut confections, and both were responses to chocolate shortages. Nutella made gianduia spreadable, and thus popular as an after-school snack on bread. Now, gianduia is considered the fourth flavor of chocolate in Italy. There’s milk, dark, white, and gianduia.

Among many desserts using chocolate in regions of Italy is melanzana chocolato: layers of fudgy chocolate sauce and eggplant, served cold – another one I want to try. Chocolate tarts, chocolate-topped couscous, cocoa-dusted pasta shells filled with pudding, four-foot-tall chocolate eggs, and La Befana

La Belfana in Chocolate

La Befana in Chocolate

an old woman who delivers gifts to children throughout Italy on Epiphany Eve (January 5). You can take gifts to chocolate-makers and they will put them into hollow eggs for you. There are chocolate tools to make work sweeter. It was starting to make my head spin, but I had to keep it together for the tasting.

But first, there was a drawing for two of Ms. Segan’s cookbooks. I didn’t win. But Mr. Miracco did invite us to enjoy the tasting and soft seats in the hall. “Don’t hurry out!” And when we discovered that, in addition to two kinds of chocolate, there were strawberries and prosecco, we were delighted to obey him.

Cookbook Won and Autographed

Cookbook Won and Autographed

Tasting

Tasting

Not Hurrying Out

Not Hurrying Out

There was an Italian chocolate I had not seen before, Antica Lavorazione a Bassa Temperatura from Antica Dolceria Bonajuto, the oldest chocolate factory in Sicily, a tablet with cacao nibs included, good for the snapping-smelling-tasting routine we had been schooled in; and Ferrero SpA’s Ferrero Rocher, the round, chocolate-covered whole hazelnut candy that has become very familiar (but has far from worn out its welcome).

The chocolate from Dolceria Bonajuto is made by a process very similar to the one brought back to Sicily from the New World by the Spaniards. The ingredients are still only cocoa, spices and sugar. It is very close to the version of chocolate known to the Aztecs – a fitting historical note.

These events were sponsored by the Italian Cultural Institute, the Italian Embassy, and Italy in US in advance of EXPO MILANO 2015, the Universal Exhibition in Milan, Italy, running from May to October. Its theme is providing food for the world’s population, while respecting the equilibrium of the planet. There will be coffee and chocolate pavilions, programs by world-class chefs, and many other attractions.

Italy in US

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So Good! Cooking with Chestnut Puree

I don’t usually use this blog to brag, but I just made such a good supper that I couldn’t resist.

I had a spaghetti squash that I needed a sauce for, and some cooked chicken, half a can of diced tomatoes, and some leftover coconut milk. How to season it to make it other than bland?

I took a bag of frozen chestnut puree from my freezer (from last fall, remember?). In a small saucepan, I brought the tomatoes to a boil, and broke in about 1/2 cup of the puree, then added about the same amount of coconut milk. Added 1 cup of diced, cooked chicken; heated just through, poured over the squash (which had been sliced and baked for 20 minutes, then forked into strands); garnished with chopped parsley, then sprinkled with finishing salt, it was amazingly good.

Spaghetti Squash With Chestnut Puree

Spaghetti Squash With Chestnut Puree

You could probably do this with commercially-packaged chestnuts, as well, but mine came from my backyard. It makes all that effort last fall worth it.

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Whisky Makes Us Frisky: Whisky Live DC

At the Whisky Live DC event at the Grand Hyatt Washington, an underground ballroom was full of tables. Behind them stood jovial purveyors of cheer, happy to pour a tot or two of their products.

View of the Tasting

View of the Tasting

There were small, local distilleries and large conglomerates, and many companies in between, among the 40 or so different brands represented. I noticed Lyon Distilling Co. from St. Michaels, with a line of small-batch whiskey and rum;

Two Lyons

Two Lyons

and Catoctin Creek Distillery in Purcellville, VA, with their rye, both part of the new distillery movement in the DMV.

Pouring From the Creek

Pouring From the Creek

Then there was a whole row occupied by tables from the Beam Suntory organization. From Jim Beam to Maker’s Mark Bourbon,

Mark That Hat!

Mark That Hat!

with a stop for Japanese whisky along the way, they circle the globe for spirits. Their Alberta Rye “Dark Batch” was particularly nice.

But the prize for conviviality for the evening went to Laphroaig and their two verry friendly men in kilts. They were pouring tiny tastes of Laphroaig 25 Year Old Single Malt, with tasting lessons and Scots toasts thrown in for local color.

A Wee Dram?

A Wee Dram?

And lest the drink overtake one before dinner, a full buffet was provided. The star of the chafing dishes was some excellent beef.

Some Excellent Beef

Some Excellent Beef

There was a band and singer offering jazz-age standards. The singer was wearing a wonderful dress, the kind only an entertainer or red-carpet walker can wear.

Cool Jazz and Sequins

Cool Jazz and Sequins

But she was rivaled for remarkableness by a woman in a shiny, plastic-looking dress.

Was It Plastic?

Was It Plastic?

For dessert, we wandered over to the Parfections table, where there was a generous spread of truffles to sample, as well as whisky pairings to drink with the chocolate.

Bad Spelling, Good Chocolate

Bad Spelling, Good Chocolate

Enough! We are sufficed for whisky for awhile. Not saying how long.

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What Chefs Talk About When They Talk To Each Other: Chef Connect: Baltimore 2015

Every profession has professional associations, and most professional associations have get-togethers. Meet and mingle, network, see the latest gadgets and raw materials, learn the trends and how to exploit them; in short, become better at what you do – that’s the aim of a professional conference or symposium.

And that was the scene at the American Culinary Federation’s Chef Connect: Baltimore last month. A sea of white jackets engulfed the meeting areas at the Marriott as hundreds of chefs and culinary students met to talk, eat, and learn from each other, speakers, and vendors. We were there, too.

How did we know we were in the right place? Why, by the ice sculpture sign at the hotel entrance, of course!

Ice Sculpture Sign

This Must Be The Place!

In the general sessions, the chefs listened to a motivational speaker

Speaker Karen McCullough and a Sea of White Jackets

Speaker Karen McCullough and a Sea of White Jackets

and saw a demo of Indonesian cooking by Steve Jilleba, from Unilever Food Solutions of Chicago. Chef Steve gave a tutorial in the ingredients and cooking methods of this exotic cuisine, together with tips on how to adapt them to the modern restaurant kitchen.

Chef Steve (right) and Assistant

Chef Steve (right) and Assistant

After the demo, chefs and students alike crowded around to take pictures of the plated dishes.

Dishes Pictured

Dishes Pictured

Gordon Food Service presented Chef Gerry Ludwig, their corporate consulting chef, speaking about menu trends for 2015. But first, he spoke in tribute to one of his favorite places in Chicago, Hot Doug’s, which recently closed. And there was one of my favorite chefs, Tony Bourdain! Alas, not in person.

Chef Gerry and Chef Tony

Chef Gerry and Chef Tony

And what are the trends, you ask? Here they are: Lamb “scrumpet” (deep-fried lamb breast fingers, a la April Bloomfield; burrata, especially domestic; kohlrabi, cold – raw or pickled; craft sodas (even Starbucks is pushing them!); and, sharing plates on wheels, aka “American dim sum.”

On the way out, we passed a table where one of the attendees had spread out her booty so far. Knives, notes and nibbles, among other swag.

A Nice Collection

A Nice Collection

Outside the ballroom, there was a small exhibition set up. There were chef’s tools and clothing vendors, product purveyors, and services for sale.

The Vertical Farm's Microgreens

The Vertical Farm’s Microgreens

Mercer's Knife Display

Mercer’s Knife Display

And an amazing coffee bar with every type of brew: ready-made for those who couldn’t wait for the pour-overs, French-press or espresso drinks; also tea – three types of brewed iced and many kinds of hot, courtesy of Royal Cup.

Coffee Any Way

Caffeine Any Way

The afternoon sessions were educations in beer and food pairings, beef and wine pairings, cooking veal and, my favorite, pairing Wisconsin blue cheese and port. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board, Sara Hill led us through a tasting of five different blue cheeses paired with two ports. She directed us to take sips of port, tastes of the cheese, and augment those with dried fruit or chocolate. Very shortly I perceived a great big umami party going on in my mouth.

Sara Hill Guided the Tasting

Sara Hill Guided the Tasting

Plate of Umami, With Port

Plate of Umami, With Port

Who knew there were so many kinds of blue cheese made in Wisconsin, and that they were so good?

Then there was the oyster-shucking contest. A chef from Johnson and Wales University won. The trophy? A gold-plated oyster mounted in a box, and bragging rights.

The Shucking Contest

The Shucking Contest

There was a reception where those oysters, provided by the True Chesapeake Oyster Company, an oyster farm in Maryland, were enjoyed by all. Oh, there was other food, as well. Chefs do generally like to eat!

There was another day of program to the conference (as well as workshops the day before, and a chef’s Knowledge Bowl competition, and awards galas), but we only managed the trip on Monday. We did get the flavor of the event, though (no, I couldn’t resist the pun). For professional chefs and students, attendance at Chef Connect would be an excellent way to advance one’s career.

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Whisky Live DC Coming on March 7

DC’s premier tasting event, featuring the finest scotches, bourbons and whiskies from around the world, will take place this Saturday, March 7 at the Grand Hyatt Washington. It will include a full dinner buffet, master classes, music and chocolate pairings. You can get a 15% discount off the ticket price of $129 when you use the code WLDRAM. A discount deal with Uber is also in the works. For more details, and to buy tickets, visit http://www.whiskylivena.com/. The Facebook page is Whisky Live USA.

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Back Up to New York City: The 2014 Fancy Food Show, Part 2: Events On the Floor and Off the Wall

There were some tasty events happening on the show floor. I met Nancy Radke among an impressive array of opened wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano at a booth in the Italian neighborhood. “Coming to the Parm cracking at the Rogers Collection Booth?” she asked. I did not have to be asked twice.

Surrounded By Cheese

Surrounded By Cheese

It takes skill, time and at least two people to properly crack a wheel of Parm. While this delicate (but at the same time strength-requiring) task was taking place, Nancy regaled the small audience of cheese buyers and press with facts about real Parmigiano Reggiano. Everyone knows about Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status, but did you know that every wheel can be traced to its manufacturer through a QR code?

Right Down The Middle

Right Down The Middle

Then there was Cooking with Nonna at the Casillo booth. Rossella Rago, host of that TV series, had brought not one but two nonnas, and one of them was her actual Nonna (Italian grandmother for non-paisanos), Nonna Romana. They demonstrated making pasta with Casillo products, and everybody had a taste. Buona!

Nonna, Rossella, Nonna

Nonna, Rossella, Nonna

 

Watch That Rolling Pin!

Watch That Rolling Pin!

Out in the hallway, there was a taste of the high-tech future. A ChefJet 3D printer had been set up, and it was busy printing sugar sculpture – fantastic shapes and colors which could hardly have been imagined until recently.

The ChefJet Printer

The ChefJet Printer

There were little cube variations, almost too cute to eat.

Sugar Not-Cubes

Sugar Not-Cubes

And there was a convoluted masterpiece to admire.

Wow!

Wow!

Liz van Hasseln of 3D Systems told me that they have digitized and printed rare orchid specimens for the Smithsonian Institution. I can’t wait to see what chefs and food designers come up with to produce on these machines! They are getting less expensive and more accessible every day.

Lastly, a party at the hip Hotel Americano (a very Eurostyle place, despite its name), hosted by the Casillo Group, featured Rossella Rago and Nonna Romana from the booth demo.

There's Nonna Romana!

There’s Nonna Romana!

The occasion was the launch of Casillo’s new video campaign, which was previewed at the party. We met a man wearing a beautiful jacket, who turned out to be the film’s director, Carlos Solito.

It Has Passimenterie

It Has Passimenterie

There were beautiful people, delicious pasta, signature cocktails, copious antipasti, and loud music.

Pasta On Offer

Pasta On Offer

The Hipness Of The Party Is Judged By The Size Of The Cameras

The Hipness Of The Party Is Judged By The Size Of The Cameras

Partiers

Eating, Drinking, Talking

A good time was had by all.

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Back Up to New York City: The 2014 Fancy Food Show, Part 1: World Tour in a Day (or Three)

For some reason, I found the most interesting booths and events at this year’s show were those from outside the USA. The World Cup may have had something to do with it, but as this report describes my subjective view of the show, so be it.

In one of the first aisles beyond the entrance, the exhibitors from Japan were offering exotic tastes. The representative from Abukuma Foods had a big hit with pickled baby peaches, eaten whole, pit and all. Sweet-tasting and a beautiful emerald green, craft cocktail makers would love them.

Baby Green Peaches

Baby Green Peaches

Further down, the Jabri confection booth had a beautiful display of sweets.

Impressive And Delicious

Impressive And Delicious

But Peru lured one in with pisco as well as food. One of many booths to offer continuous and varied tastes of native cuisine, Peru demonstrated the art of cooking with quinoa as well as artichokes (Peru’s biggest produce export – who knew?), olives, and chocolate. And much pisco.

In Peru, One Drinks Pisco

In Peru, One Drinks Pisco

And on the drinks theme, there were impressive, shiny espresso machines,

From Italy, Natch!

From Italy, Natch!

Beer and cocktails in Mexico,

Did She Dye Her Hair To Match The Drink?

Did She Dye Her Hair To Match The Drink?

Lemon-colored limoncello sellers,

Lemon Limon

Lemon Limon

And a woman in a wonderful sari offering Ceylon tea.

Tea Sari

Tea Sari

Morocco and Germany were once again across the aisle from each other. Germany had sausage on offer, but Morocco let out all the hospitality stops with copious food, including a delicious harara soup.

Morocco With Germany In The Background

Morocco With Germany In The Background

Sit, Have Some Tea!

Sit, Have Some Tea!

In the Italian neighborhood (many aisles of booths), the beautiful red prosciutto slicer was manned by the handsome guy I remembered from last year.

He Can Cut It!

He Can Cut It!

But down the row, there was an even more impressive black job, the “Parma 50.” That’s serious slicing! But then, everyone at the show is serious about food.

This One Means Business

This One Means Business

But right off the exhibit hall, there were monitors set up to follow the World Cup, and some folks seemed even more serious about football.

Goooaaal!

Goooaaal!

Next: Part 2, Events on the Floor and Off the Wall

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Best Hot Chocolate Ever – And Some Excellent Crafts, Too

We were lured to the press preview of the new exhibit, Cutting-Edge Spanish Crafts, Innovation and Design in Contemporary Crafts Industries, at the Former Residence of the Ambassadors of Spain by the promise of chocolate con churros. We were not disappointed.

I have had hot chocolate in several places in New Mexico and next door to the FRotAoS at the Mexican Cultural Institute, but this stuff topped them all. I understand that the test for truly awesome hot chocolate in Spain is that the churro stands up in it without support; it did indeed.

Chocolate con Churros

Chocolate con Churros

This chocolate was so rich and thick (and not too sweet) that one cupful was enough, but I found that mixing it half-and-half with the coffee which had been thoughtfully provided was also a delightful experience.

Before we could fall into a theobromine coma, we were addressed by none other than the Spanish Ambassador, His Excellency Ramón Gil-Casares, welcoming us and introducing Alicia Adams from the Kennedy Center. She disclosed some exciting details about the upcoming Iberian Suite: Global Arts Remix, a major festival highlighting the cultures of the Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking world. Scheduled for March 3rd thru 24th, there will be performances, visual arts exhibitions and installations, and events for literature, design, cuisine, and family participation. It sounds amazing! And, we are lucky enough to live in the neighborhood.

Curator Tachy Mora, Ambassador Gil-Casares, Ms. Alicia Adams

Curator Tachy Mora, Ambassador Gil-Casares, Ms. Alicia Adams

Then we were treated to a guided tour of the exhibit by the curator, Ms. Tachy Mora. This is a diverse collection of examples of design, craftsmanship and clever use of materials from individual craftspeople as well as industries, complemented by a large coffee-table book written by Ms. Mora.

Tachy Mora and Her Book

Tachy Mora and Her Book

Familiar names such as Llandro mixed with those more obscure. I loved the realistic parakeets from Llandro, in contrast to the stylized and idiosyncratic objects which we are used to seeing from this maker. Despite the wide distribution of its output, this Valencian company continues to produce all its products by hand.

The Llandro Case

The Llandro Case

Perching Llandro Birds

Perching Llandro Birds

There was a set of organic-inspired candles designed by Jordi Labanda of Cerabella, winner of a Spanish National Crafts Award. Each candle is dipped multiple times, and takes a full day to make.

Crafted Candles

Crafted Candles

One set of felt balls, although artful, seemed to defy practicality. Maybe it was just me, having a failure of imagination? These “Cocos Pallaresos,” wool containers made by artisan Ester Sánchez, are the result of a revival of traditional felt craft from Catalonia. “They are to put things in – whatever you want,” Ms. Mora explained, helpfully.

Enigmatic Felt Balls

Enigmatic Felt Balls

My favorite objects were a set of Hilo vases, inspired by Spanish botijos (traditional porous clay water containers), by Marre Moerel. decorated by using a pastry bag to distribute decoration around the body of the vase. Each piece is decorated by hand, and is therefore unique.

Pastry Bag Vases

Pastry Bag Vases

The design of the exhibition emphasizes the “importedness” of the objects on display, utilizing packing crates, pallets and heavy clear plastic panels instead of glass. Clever, but hard to take an undistorted picture through!

Glass Behind Plastic

Glass Behind Plastic

This exhibit will continue until March 29, at the Former Residence of the Ambassadors of Spain,
2801 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20009

Gallery hours: Thursday through Sunday from 12 pm to 6 pm;
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday by appointment at: contact@spainculture.us
Admission is free.

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